Monday, 13 September 2010

EDMO's - Shocking statistics reveal how ineffective they are.

Parliamentary Questions - Empty Dwelling Management Orders
Communities and Local Government
Written answers and statements, 9 September 2010
Graham Jones (Hyndburn, Labour)
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many empty dwelling management orders have been issued in each local authority area in each year since 2006.
* Hansard source (Citation: HC Deb, 9 September 2010, c603W)

Grant Shapps (Minister of State (Housing and Local Government), Communities and Local Government; Welwyn Hatfield, Conservative)
A list of Empty Dwelling Management Orders issued in each local authority in each year since 2006 is as follows:
Authority & Number of EDMOs
2006
South Oxfordshire DC 1

2007
Carlisle DC 1
LB Hounslow 1
LB Lewisham 5
Norwich CC 1
Peterborough CC 1
Swale BC 1
Wychavon DC 1

2008
LB Bromley 1
LB Hammersmith & Fulham 1
Norwich CC 5
South Norfolk DC 1

2009
Bolton BC 1
Carlisle DC 1
New Forest DC 1
Peterborough CC 1
Southend on Sea 2
South Gloucestershire Council 1
South Tyneside BC 1

2010
Bolton BC 1
LB Lewisham 22
Staffordshire Moorlands DC 1
Stockton on Tees Council 1
Empty Management Dwelling Orders are a waste of time and I have argued this point for quite awhile. The table above highlights just how few local authorities use them.

EDMO's allow local authorities to take over the management of badly let or vacant properties for initially a 12month period, followed by a 7 year period. Any costs have to be recovered from the rent. Ownership is not removed and can be no charge against the property for repairs.

The legislation is badly set out and set's barriers to any real effective use. Normally local authorities would consider using EDMO's where serious problems occur, in effect properties with lots of problems. In London high rents make it possible to establish EDMO's where those high rents can cover repairs.

We have seen how bad the private sector rented sector is and this figures are shocking in respect of the action required to deal with the industry.