Wednesday, 12 June 2013

A ONE NATION PLAN FOR SOCIAL SECURITY REFORM

Ed Miliband has this week set out what One Nation Labour would do to control spending social security and get Britain working.

David Cameron and George Osborne’s economic failure means there will be less money around in 2015. We need to start planning for that difficult inheritance now. If we are going to turn our economy around, protect our NHS, and build a stronger country, we will have to be laser focused on how we spend every single pound. And that includes social security.

But One Nation Labour will control spending on the basis of our values, not the Tories’ failed approach.


Controlling social security spending and putting decent values at the heart of the system are not conflicting priorities. It is only by reforming social security with the right values that we’ll be able to control costs. Overcoming worklessness, rewarding work and tackling low pay, investing in the future and recognising contribution: these are the Labour ways to reform our social security system.

The Tories seek to use every opportunity to divide this country and set one group of people against another. But they have a dirty secret. They may talk tough but they leave people out of work for year after year, costing the country a fortune. Instead One Nation Labour will pass on to our children a social security system that is sustainable. And a system that works and is supported. We can use the talents of everyone. Demand responsibility. And seek to move forward as a united country.

Labour has always been the party of work – the clue is in our name. These are the principles that will guide Labour’s approach: work for everyone who can work, must be the starting point for social security reform: cutting the costs of worklessness. Change our economy, so that welfare is not a substitute for good employment and decent jobs. Investing in building homes again, not paying for the failure not to through housing benefit. Restore people’s faith in the system by rewarding the years of contribution they make. And capping structural social security spending to help control costs.